Submissions to the Journal

One of NCSSM’s core tenets is its emphasis on research, with over a third of the entire student body actively participating in some form of scientific research. The caliber and diversity of this research necessitated the Broad Street Scientific, an annual publication that showcases the research conducted by students at NCSSM. Now faculty, students, universities, researchers, and prospective sponsors can appreciate the success of NCSSM’s research program.

Students may submit PDFs to broadstreetscientific@gmail.com. Please be sure to include the papers type and category in this email. Also, check with your mentor for permission to publish your work.

Broad Street Scientific Submission Guidelines:

Please verify that your submission meets the requirements of the Broad Street Scientific style guide before submitting your paper.

Submissions may be one of three types:

  1. Original Research Paper – Documentation of complete research project in the most appropriate format for the discipline of study – 13,000 to 26,000 characters and one page of illustrations
  2. Literature Review – A review of previous research and future work for a specific field of study – Up to 13,000 characters
  3. Scientific Essay – Reflection or argumentative analysis on a scientific topic – Up to 8,000 characters

Please send manuscripts to broadstreetscientific@gmail.com.

Original Research Paper:

Your original research paper should include the following components:

  1. Abstract – In 100-200 words, write a technical synopsis of your paper that includes background, methods, results, and conclusions.
  2. Introduction – Start with a broad picture of the importance and significance of your chosen field while explaining introductory concepts. State the problem and goals that your research will address. Please cite any referenced literature.
  3. Materials & Methods – Describe how you performed your work, referencing methods and procedures of previous research conducted. Focus on the important aspects of your methods and avoid going into too much detail in describing commonly used methods.
  4. Results – Present your findings in sufficient detail so that the reader can understand the results that were obtained or can follow the arguments of a mathematical proof. All figures should be high quality (minimum 300 ppi) and captioned appropriately so that they can be independently interpreted.
  5. Discussion – Demonstrate how your results are statistically significant and address the research questions posed in the introduction. Interpret your results and the implications of your findings with respect to your field and describe their possible applications.
  6. Conclusion – Recap briefly what was learned from your research and assess the validity of your conclusions. Consider what questions might still remain to be answered and put them in terms of future work and how your research could act as a foundation in addressing these questions.
  7. References – References should use APA format and in text citations should be numbered. For example, for a paper by Smith et al., cite the paper in the text with “[1]” and then in the numbered references page, reference 1 should be the cited paper by Smith et al.
  8. Acknowledgements

Literature Reviews

While referencing relevant research, recount the scientific progress of the topic under consideration. Model your diction after professional peer-reviewed journals in your chosen field, but do not assume that the reader has previous knowledge of your topic. Assume, however, that the reader is reasonably well-versed in your discipline.

References should use APA format and in text citations should be numbered. For example, for a paper by Smith et al., cite the paper in the text with “[1]” and then in the numbered references page, reference 1 should be the cited paper by Smith et al.

Scientific Essays

Start with a topic that interests you and briefly describe the background information in a manner understandable to those not familiar with the scientific discipline. After evaluating current research, take a stance on your topic by addressing any questions. For example:

  • Is there a possible avenue of research that seems promising in the future?
  • Have you thought about a different way to approach the topic at hand?
  • What makes this topic interesting?

These guidelines were adopted from the Siemens Competition requirements (2012).